Collection

D101610
D101615
D101618

The Abduction of a Sabine Woman

Details

Giambologna, Antonio Susini

Florence, first quarter 17th century

Bronze

H. 58.9 cm

From the Kunstkammer of the Hessian Landgraves in Cassel. Acquired from the art trade in 1952

Inv. No. 52/118

Gallery 25

Sculpture

Renaissance

Description

According to Roman myth, there were not enough women in the newly founded city of Rome. For this reason, the Romans set out to abduct the women of the neighbouring Sabine tribe. With his composition of three nude bodies spiralling upwards and perfectly balanced from all sides, Giambologna, the court artist of the Medici in Florence, created the most superb representation of the subject in the medium of sculpture. Completed in 1582, this larger-than-life marble sculpture, can still be admired today on the Piazza della Signoria in Florence. In fact, the artist only gave his sculpture its title later. The Munich group is the finest and most detailed of a series of small-format versions in bronze executed by Giambologna's most important collaborators.

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